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Education

How Social Media Marketing can be fresh every day

I’ve heard people say that they never have anything to talk about with regards to marketing their websites or products. That it’s always the same thing day after day and there’s never anything to talk about and that they’re too busy to see beyond the day to day activities that keep them busy.

I would disagree with this.  And here’s why.

rafting-on-the-Arkansas-river

Rafting on the Arkansas River in Colorado

Many years ago I was a river guide on the most popular stretch of river in the US – Brown’s Canyon on the Arkansas river in Buena Vista.  I guided that river every day for almost 10 years.  About year 4, I got bored with floating the same stretch of 8-12 miles every day (many times twice a day!).  One day I decided that I was going to look for something new on the river every day to see what I could find.  I quickly discovered that there was sooooo much more going on under my nose than I had EVER imagined!  I saw ruins of old buildings, waterfalls, plants, birds, rock formations, rapids, etc.  And in doing this, I was able to share much more of the natural history with my friends and passengers that I was able to get to know my passengers better and greatly enhance their trip in ways I had never imagined.

As a side result, I became a better boater too.

This is Social Media Marketing.  Noticing new things every day and being able to talk about them in one social way or another.  Whether you use a blog, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or some other avenue of communication, you can be social.  Find something you’re passionate about and share it – regularly.

How Bad Are Water Bottles, Really?

Jackson Browne rants to blogger Beth Terry of Fake Plastic Fish about bottled water after the screening of the film Tapped organized by the Plastic Pollution Coalition. He says bottled water is “inconvenient” and compares albatross chicks that starve from eating plastic to our society in which we are starving for “real food and real information.” Jackson also talks about how he carries his own reusable water bottle through airport security and brings his own water cooler on tour to avoid plastic water bottles.

National Museum of the American Indian

The waterfall at the National Museum of the American Indian

National Museum of the American Indian Waterfall and Pool

The reflecting pool below the waterfall.

The Pool Below the Waterfall

Outside of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, they have a fabulous water feature that is part of the entire outdoor environment.  It’s supposed to be much like it used to be when the Native Americans populated the land around Washington DC.  From their website:

Wetlands
Culturally significant to many tribes, wetlands are rich, biologically diverse environments. The museum’s diverse wetlands area—and the ducks, squirrels, and dragonflies that make it their home—represent the original Chesapeake Bay environment prior to European settlement. Chesapeake means “Great Shellfish Bay” in the Algonquian language. River birch, swamp milkweed, pond lilies, silky willow, and wild rice abounded in the dense marshes, as they do in the museum’s natural habitat.

If you get a chance to see it next time your in or near DC, I would highly recommend it.

The Colorado River Is Drying Up – Great info graphic on the Colorado River Compact.

The Colorado River compact is a complex legal agreement set in place years ago. The information and link below is good information that helps to simplify it and make it a bit more clear.

The Colorado River is the source of water for most of the southwest and southern California. All those states have to share the water from the river, and a complex set of agreements known as the Law of the River governs how much water they can take in a given year. Over at Grist, they’re doing a large series on the health of America’s rivers. For a piece on the Colorado River, we worked together on this infographic, in partnership with New Belgium Brewery, to see which states are closing in on their limits. With populations growing, the remaining water could disappear fast.

Click here to view the infographic in a larger size.

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